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A fairly, um, wide selection of photos this week from a car that’s not, quite, an itasha to panoramic views.

Not Quite an Itasha

First up is this car with a striking, and beautiful, custom paint job that I saw on Friday:

Left side

Left side

Right side

Right side

House of Representatives Gardens

The gardens to the both sides of Old Parliament House (OPH), aka the Museum of Australian Democracy, were restored some time ago. Among other things they contain some impressive rose gardens, and although I don’t know the exact varietals I did get some close-ups of a couple (which I rarely do with photography).

Red

Red

Pink(ish)

Pink(ish)

The View From the House

The view from the steps of OPH (which is where this happened) is spectacular. The new new camera has a neat Panorama mode where as you turn the camera it displays a cross hair on the screen to indicate where the next picture will be taken. The camera then processes the images on board to produce the panorama. I kind of like it, but I’d be interested to see what people think:

Panorama View

Panorama View

This is a more traditional shot cropped to cut the parking lot (and taken sometime later so that the bus had moved and you can see the Treaty and Sovereignty signs at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy).

Cropped Landscape

Cropped Landscape

 The House and the Senate

Looking at the panoramas later, I do find them slightly disorienting. On the other hand they do allow for a complete view of the House and Senate chambers in OPH.

The entry views work reasonably well:

House of Representatives - Entry

House of Representatives – Entry

Senate - Entry

Senate – Entry

The panoramas taken from by the Speaker’s Chair and the President’s Chair are… less successful. To put it charitably.

House of Representatives from by the Speaker's Chair

House of Representatives from by the Speaker’s Chair

Senate from by the President's Chair

Senate from by the President’s Chair

The Prime Minister and the Staffers

The Prime Minister’s office has been a feature at OPH for a while, but the restoration efforts have now included the work areas for the staffers. It’s quite a contrast since you go from this…

Yeah, that's a little cramped.

Yeah, that’s a little cramped.

…down a narrow corridor flanked by tiny offices for no more than 20 paces to this:

Bit more room in here. :)

Bit more room in here. 🙂

The contrast really is striking.

(There’s also a new Press Gallery exhibit, but I’ll visit that again before I take photos of it. It is worth a look.)

Bad Mr Chomps! No Biscuit!

I’ve acquired a few plushies over the years, including a Meerkat and a Mr Chomps Raptorbot. Sometime recently someone in the house posed them like this:

Bad Raptor! No Biscuit!

Bad Raptor! No Biscuit!

On the Way To Mount Ainslie

I went on a bit of a photo walk today to and up Mount Ainslie (yes, my feet are hurting a bit at the moment, why do you ask?). I’ve noted before that Canberra can occasionally have odd bits and pieces about the place, and here’s a couple I found in a park along the way:

Abandoned toy on a pole

Abandoned toy on a pole

Abandoned toy on an abandoned hydrant?

Abandoned toy on an abandoned hydrant?

Judging by the paint job (or lack thereof) and the cobwebs, I don’t think that hydrant is in use anymore. It’s right next to the electricity pole by the way.

I also snapped this shot of a cloud formation on a whim. I kind of like it so here it is:

Clouds and trees

Clouds and trees

Roughly from where I took this, I also took a shot of where I was heading to:

Do you see the aircraft warning light?

Do you see the aircraft warning light?

Oh, you can’t see it. Here, let me zoom in a bit. Well, a LOT:

p3050184-2

You should be able to see it now

Climbing Mount Ainslie

One of the nice touches about this climbing path is that the entire path is something of a memorial for the Kokoda Trail. This is at the start and there are smaller plaques along the way describing the history of key points on the trail:

The start of the Kokoda Trail Memorial

The start of the Kokoda Trail Memorial

As for the path itself, it’s about 2.25 KM in either direction and, although these photos don’t really show it, can get fairly steep:

Going up...

Going up…

...And coming back down

…And coming back down

Mount Ainslie

You know that aircraft warning light I mentioned. Here it is once you get to the top:

You should be able to see some actual details now.

You should be able to see some actual details now.

Once I got to the viewing deck, well, here’s the inevitable panorama (which I think turned out well enough this time):

The Panoramic View From Mount Ainslie

The Panoramic View From Mount Ainslie

And a straight up landscape shot:

The Landscape Shot

The Landscape Shot

An Experimental Selfie

One of the features on the phone is onboard wifi. Sadly this seems to be limited to connecting to a phone rather than to a wifi network generally for uploading photos. However, it does come with a smartphone app that acts as a remote control.

On that note: BEHOLD! The first (and probably only) selfie that I’m likely to share online, taken with a camera that was about 2 metres away from me:

To be honest I’m not sure whether I’ll use this function much in the future. If I do plan on using it, I may have to invest in a small tripod, possibly one of the gorilla tripods, to get better positioning of the camera. Then again, that might be useful anyway for panorama shots in terms of ensuring that the camera remains in the same position whilst being rotated.

That’s it for this week. Here’s the links to last week’s photos part 1 and part 2. As always please leave a comment if you have any feedback on these photos, or suggestions for something in Canberra you’d like to see next week.